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FTC Issues Policy Statement Affirming that Health Apps Must Comply with FTCFTC Issues Policy Statement Affirming that Health Apps and Connected Device Companies Must Comply with FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule

FTC Issues Policy Statement Affirming that Health Apps and Connected Device Companies Must Comply with FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule

At an open commission meeting on Wednesday, September 15th, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) voted 3-2 to approve a policy statement affirming that health apps and connected devices that draw information from multiple sources need to comply with the FTC’s August 2009 Health Breach Notification Rule. The policy statement serves as a notice to health apps and connected devices – companies that are traditionally not covered entities under HIPAA –  “of their ongoing obligation to come clean about breaches”.  The statement also affirms that the entities may be subject to civil penalties of up to $43,792 per violation per day.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act of 2009) required the FTC to enforce breach notification requirements with respect to vendors and third parties and to adopt a rule implementing such requirements. Under the Health Breach Notification Rule, vendors of personal health records and related entities must notify U.S. consumers and the FTC, and, in some cases the media, if there has been a breach of unsecured identifiable health information.

Acknowledging that it has now been more than a decade since the promulgation of the Health Breach Notification Rule and that there has been a proliferation of apps and technologies that consumers can now use “to track diseases, diagnoses, treatment, medications, fitness, fertility, sleep, mental health, diet, and other vital areas,” the FTC affirmed on Wednesday that apps capable of drawing information from multiple sources (such as through a combination of consumer inputs and APIs) are covered, even if the health information comes from only one source.

You can read the full policy statement of the FTC here.

FTC Chair Lina M. Khan and Commissioners Rohit Chopra and Rebecca Kelly Slaughter voted in favor of the policy statement, while Commissioners Joshua Phillips and Christine S. Wilson each issued dissenting statements. The dissenting opinions asserted that this statutory and regulatory opinion should be determined in the context of the rulemaking process that is currently under way, rather than a policy statement.

It is important that companies developing health apps and connected devices be aware of this announcement.  Beckage closely monitors developments in laws and regulations governing health data and breach response. Beckage’s team of highly skilled attorneys and technologists are uniquely situated to assist clients as they navigate these changes.

Email Beckage Health Law Team Lead Sarah L. Rugnetta, Esq., (CIPP/E) at srugnetta@beckage.com or call 716.898.2102 for assistance in analyzing this and other regulatory and legislative matters in the Health Law space.

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Colorado Privacy ActThe Colorado Privacy Act: Explained

The Colorado Privacy Act: Explained

On July 8th, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed Senate Bill 190, the Colorado Privacy Act (CPA), into law. The Act is the third comprehensive state privacy law in the United States, following California’s Consumer Privacy Act and Virginia’s Consumer Data Protection Act.

The CPA is applicable to businesses that collect and store data on more than 100,000 individuals or those earning revenue from the data of more than 25,000 consumers. The bill also includes various data subject rights, a broad opt-out consent model with a universal opt-out mechanism, a right to cure, and attorney general rulemaking and enforcement. It is set to go into effect on July 1, 2023.

The CPA carries specific rights for the consumer including:

  • Opt-out of processing of personal data.
  • Authorization of another person to act on behalf of the consumer to opt-out of the processing of personal data for purposes of targeted advertising or the sale of consumer data.
  • Confirm whether personal data is being processed and access that data in a portable and readily usable format.
  • Correct inaccurate personal data.
  • Delete personal data.
  • Obtain consent before collection of certain sensitive personal data (data that reveals race or ethnic origin, religious beliefs, a mental or physical health condition or diagnosis, sexual orientation or sex life, citizenship or citizenship status, or genetic or biometric data).

The right to opt-out model gives consumers a user-selected universal opt-out mechanism for executing their opt-out right, however, it applies to targeted advertising and the sale of information. Consumers cannot opt out of unnecessary and irrelevant collection of information.  Controllers must comply with the universal opt-out. Consumer requests must be verifiable, and a controller may deny the request if the request cannot be authenticated.

All consumers are provided the opportunity to appeal any denials of request. Under the act, all controllers are required to respond to a consumer’s request to exercise their rights within 45 days of receiving the request. The time period may be extended an additional 45 days with a notice of delay and reasons for the delay.

The controllers must receive a consumer’s consent before processing a consumer’s sensitive information. Consent must be a clear, affirmative act signifying a consumer’s freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous consent. Consent cannot be obtained by way of acceptance of general or broad terms of use. While the CPA requires consent to process “sensitive” personal data, the bill exempts protected health information and de-identified information under HIPAA, financial institutions and nonpublic personal information under the Gramm-Leach Bliley Act, information regulated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act, Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, and information regulated by the Driver’s Privacy Protection Act of 1994. The CPA also exempts information maintained for employment records purposes.

Under the CPA, controllers are also required to conduct and document data protection assessments of each of its processing activities that involves personal data acquired when conducting processing that presents a heightened risk of harm to a consumer.

Controllers must provide a privacy notice to the consumer including:

  • Categories of personal data collected, processed, and/or shared with third parties,
  • Purposes for processing such data,
  • Categories of third parties with whom the controller shares personal data,
  • How and where consumers may exercise their rights, and
  • Whether the controller sells personal data or processes personal data for targeted advertising.

Data security practices must be appropriate to the volume, scope, and nature of the personal data processes and nature of the business. While the CPA carries these consumer rights and provides for several controller obligations, it does not offer a private right of action.

The Attorney General has the capability to address outstanding compliance concerns and ambiguities ahead of the law’s effective date. The Attorney General and state district attorneys will enforce the CPA. Under the bill, there is a 60-day cure period to rectify non-compliance provided before the Attorney General or district attorney may take enforcement action. The cure period is only provided until January 1, 2025, and noncompliance can result in civil penalties of not more than $2,000 per violation, not to exceed $500,000 in total for any related series of violations. Again, consumers are not given the private right of action under the bill.

We anticipate more states will begin to enact legislation that will encourage the regulation of sensitive data processing and enhance consumer privacy rights. Beckage will continue to monitor any developments regarding the bill. Our team of highly skilled attorneys are especially equipped to help your business implement a proactive plan to help mitigate risk and remain compliant with emerging laws.

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GDPRThe EU Commission Releases the Long-Awaited Updated SCCs for Continued Cross-Border Data Transfers

The EU Commission Releases the Long-Awaited Updated SCCs for Continued Cross-Border Data Transfers

One of the most highly contentious areas under the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) is the cross-border data transfer of Personal Data out of the EU and into other regions, especially the US. Last year, the Court of Justice released its highly anticipated decision, Schrems II, where it invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield as a lawful mechanism to transfer Personal Data into the US but upheld the continued use of the Standard Contractual Clauses (“SCCs”). However, the Court signaled a heightened tension around the transfer of data, even using the SCCs, from the EU to the US, directing companies to consider whether those transfers would require “supplemental measures” prior to utilizing the SCCs to transfer Personal Data from the EU to the US.

In the wake of that decision, the EU Commission, charged with adopting the SCCs, announced its plans to update the SCCs to align with the Schrems II decision, to generally update the document. To date, the current form SCCs used for cross-border data transfers were adopted under the GDPR’s predecessor, the EU Directive on Data Protection, in 2001.

For the last two decades, companies across the globe leveraged the SCCs to validate the on-going transfers of personal data across many borders. However, with the increasing complexities of technology and multi-party data transactions, the limited form and nature of the SCCs continued to create challenges in leveraging the standard documents to fit varying types of cross-border data transfers. On Friday, June 4, 2021, the EU Commission released its long anticipated updated form of the Standard Contractual Clauses, available here.

The New Form Standard Contractual Clauses

The new SCCs include robust obligations on both importers and exporters of personal data under the GDPR and the Schrems II decision. Further, the new SCCs are intended to provide more flexibility and options for companies to better address the complex nature of data transfers.

The new SCCs also include modules for entities to leverage depending on the relationship between the parties involved in the transfer, i.e., controller to processer; processor to processor; etc.  These changes are intended to further align with modern data transfers and to promote the free flow of data. In the EU Commission Press-Release, Vice-President for Values and Transparency, Vera Jourová emphasized that the SCCs provide a useful tool for the free-flow of data:

“In Europe, we want to remain open and allow data to flow, provided that the protection flows with it. The modernized Standard Contractual Clauses will help to achieve this objective: they offer businesses a useful tool to ensure they comply with data protection laws, both for their activities within the EU and for international transfers. This is a needed solution in the interconnected digital world where transferring data takes a click or two.”

The Impact of the New SCCs

The new SCCs are expected to impact and streamline the process of adopting the appropriate contractual language to allow for the cross-border exchange of personal data. Further, the clauses are intended to align closer to the GDPR requirements, which went into effect in 2018, and the recent Schrems II guidance. Commissioner for Justice, Didier Reynders, emphasized that:

“In our modern digital world, it is important that data can be shared with the necessary protection – inside and outside the EU. With these reinforced clauses, we are giving more safety and legal certainty to companies for data transfers. After the Schrems II ruling, it was our duty and priority to come up with user-friendly tools, which companies can fully rely on. This package will significantly help companies to comply with the GDPR.”

The updated SCCs focus on the following key updates:

  • Align with the GDPR and Schrems II decision;
  • Provide simple and flexible model clauses for international transfers;
  • Include more robust data protection obligations (e.g., requiring importers to allow regular audits upon exporter request); and
  • Allow for third parties to acceded to existing SCCS as data exporter or importer (under the Docking Clause).

Transition to New SCCs

The new SCCs go into effect in approximately 20 days. Businesses leveraging previous versions of the SCCs have 18 months to transition to the new SCCs.

Overall, these new SCCs will allow companies to use contractual agreements in the cross-border transfer of personal data that better align to the increasingly complex nature of these transactions. Further, the new versions come at a critical juncture, when companies are struggling to implement the guidance of Schrems II and continue to leverage data processing in multiple regions around the world.  In the wake of the invalidation of the EU-US Privacy Shield, and heightened challenges with cross-border data transfers, the SCCs demonstrate the EU’s commitment to addressing data protection while continuing to allow the continued data flows out of the EU.

In light of this critical development, Beckage recommends that clients taken immediate steps to evaluate all existing agreements that will need to be updated with the new SCCs.  As stated above, companies will have up to 180 days to amend previously executed DPAs to include the new form SCCs. As such, companies will need to discuss a process to review its previously executed contracts and develop a plan to roll out amendments. Additionally, moving forward, companies will need to leverage the updated form SCCs in all new Data Processing Agreements.

At Beckage, we have a team of highly skilled attorneys certified in comprehensive GDPR knowledge that can help your company work towards compliance and data protection in both Europe and the United States.  Beckage works with clients to review current policies and assess data security practices.  Our team can help implement a plan to address the new SCCs.  

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Data Privacy DayBeckage Attorneys Make 2021 Data Security & Privacy Predictions in Observance of Data Privacy Day

Beckage Attorneys Make 2021 Data Security & Privacy Predictions in Observance of Data Privacy Day

Today is Data Privacy Day – an international event held annually on January 28th with the purpose of promoting privacy and data protection best practices for consumers and businesses. At Beckage, every day is Data Privacy Day – our team of lawyers and technologists works daily with clients on data security and privacy measures, from developing policies and procedures to comply with international and domestic privacy regimes to responding to headline-making data incidents and defending clients in data security and privacy class actions.

The legal landscape surrounding data security and privacy is constantly evolving to adapt to technological advancements and global privacy trends. In observance of this holiday, we asked some of our experienced team members what they expect to see in this space in 2021.


Litigation – Myriah V. Jaworski, Esq. CIPP/US, CIPP/E

My data privacy prediction for 2021 is also related to biometrics. This year we will see the continued rise of regulation over and litigation concerning the use of biometric information.

A few years after the Illinois State Legislature passed BIPA, the Biometric Information Privacy Act, we started to see a slew of class action lawsuits filed against businesses alleged to have violated BIPA’s written release requirement. BIPA class actions have ranged from headline-making cases against major tech companies, such has Facebook, to small and medium-sized businesses across numerous industries.

While biometric lawsuits were once viewed as a risk associated only with doing business in Illinois, other states, like Washington and Texas, have followed suit by passing their own laws mimicking BIPA and others are eyeing their own biometric privacy bills. Of note, a bill nearly identical to BIPA is pending in the New York State legislature, which, if passed, could have a much larger impact on businesses given that New York is one of the largest economies in the United States.

At the federal level, we have recently seen the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enter the biometric conversation with its consent agreement with EverAlbum, Inc. This consent order may have set a nation-wide standard for businesses’ use and collection of biometric information, regardless of whether those businesses operate in states that have enacted or pending biometric privacy laws.

In short, in 2021 the risks and penalties associated with collecting and using biometric information are steep. Any business, regardless of location, that is engaging in biometric information collection should conduct a privacy audit, look at its written policies, and ensure that it has the requisite consents in mind. As a litigator, I always say “demonstrable compliance is the strongest legal defense,” and that is certainly true in the biometric privacy space.

Watch Myriah’s video prediction here.


Incident Response – Daniel P. Greene, Esq., CIPP/US, CIPP/E

At the heart of what we do as incident response privacy practitioners is data breach prevention.  My 2021 prediction for the privacy landscape is an expansion in the use of multi-factor authentication. This is great news for incident response because, often, multi-factor authentication is an important step in helping to avoid a data incident and protect the privacy of data.

Multi-factor authentication is when a user identifies themself through biometrics, like a facial or fingerprint scan, or though entering a code on a device to confirm access to sensitive spaces, like a bank account or work network. It helps in avoiding unauthorized access and we expect to see this technology used in new spaces in 2021, such as when using an ATM or checking out at a grocery store.

We also anticipate an expansion in the use of biometrics over device authentication. There have been numerous documented incidents where device authentication has backfired. A famous example occurred in 2019 when attackers were able to gain access to Twitter CEO Jeff Dorsey’s account using a SIM card swap scheme. Because biometric identifiers are much more difficult to change or duplicate, using a facial scan or fingerprint is a much more secure method of confirming a user’s identity. And while this brings up a host of other issues about safeguarding biometric information, I think we can expect to see it used a lot more soon.

Watch Dan’s video prediction here.


Government Investigations – Michael L. McCabe, Esq., CCEP

In 2021, I expect to see increased enforcement of privacy and data security laws and regulations at both the federal and state level. Considering new leadership in Washington D.C. and the looming impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, I predict not just an uptick in enforcement, but also a more muscular approach by regulators.  More enforcement actions are expected, a further reminder for companies to work with experienced tech privacy and security legal counsel to minimize legal and technical risk.

At the federal level, look for enhanced enforcement by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). On the state level, I anticipate a similar response by state attorneys general outside of Washington.   

In 2020, we saw a major uptick in cyber-attacks, due in part to companies having to quickly adopt policies for a distributed workforce.  There were also numerous COVID-related phishing attempts. These developments have resulted in a record number of data security incidents. Therefore, I expect the focus of these enforcement actions to be not just on privacy compliance, but also on effective data security and incident response.  

Watch Mike’s video prediction here.


Privacy Compliance – Kara L. Hilburger, Esq., CIPP-US

My prediction for the privacy compliance area in 2021 is the increased focus on consumer privacy rights. With California’s comprehensive privacy law, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), now one year old, there is increase awareness and attention to data subject rights.  With a myriad of other states entertaining statutes similar to the CCPA, I anticipate a host of plaintiff related lawsuits filed under these statutes’ privacy right of action provisions. The result is that business operating in this highly global, multi-jurisdictional environment will need to continue to work towards building out robust and scalable data security and privacy infrastructures that take into account not only the GDPR and CCPA but other emerging laws. For example, updating forward-facing website disclosure policies and user agreements will be paramount here to be sure they comply with the required disclosures.

Relatedly, my second prediction as that we will continue to see an uptick in litigation filed under the Americans with Disabilities Act and frankly no end is in sight.  Businesses are continuing to educate themselves on the legal standards necessary for building and maintaining an accessible website.  We also anticipate much in the way of legislation or increase DOJ involvement in this area under the new administration.

Watch Kara’s video prediction here.


Health Law – Allison K. Prout, Esq., Cert. AWS Cloud Practitioner

With so much of our everyday lives moving online in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have seen a large uptick in data breaches caused by third-party vendors and service providers. And when it comes to the healthcare industry, I anticipate a continued increase in incidents that originate with business associates and other vendors providing services to covered entities. 

 In fact, about 40% of HIPAA breaches involve or are caused by business associates. With a new administration that’s likely to favor regulatory action, we expect to see regulatory authorities continue to enforce actions against covered entities whose business associates or service providers experience breaches. 

So what does this mean for the industry?  We expect to see covered entities taking a much closer look at who they are working with—and whether those parties have robust security and privacy protocols. For this reason, business associates may need to prepare accordingly. Whether you are a covered entity or a business associate, now is the time to dust off vendor due diligence and monitoring policies and procedures. It’s also a good idea to take a closer look at those service agreements and business associate agreements to make sure your service providers are making the right security commitments—and assuming responsibility—when there’s a breach.

Watch Allie’s video prediction here.


Global Data Privacy – Jordan L. Fischer, Esq. CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPM

My first prediction for the global data privacy space in 2021 is the creation and evolution of additional data privacy regulations across the globe. The so-called “GDPR Effect” has been pushing data privacy trends across the globe, and we expect to this to continue as more regions and countries adopt legislation mimicking parts of the GDPR, putting their own unique twist on data privacy, or modernizing their existing data privacy regulations to make them more compatible with the GDPR and other global privacy regimes.

My second prediction is a major emphasis on cross-border data transfers. The 2020 Schrems II decision invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield for sending data from Europe to the United States. This decision was focused on data transfers between the United States and the European Union, but it also highlights a challenge we are continuing to see in international law – while these privacy regulations see borders, the digital realm does not.  Thus, it is increasingly hard to segment data and maintain it within a specific region. This year, I anticipate a lot of tension between regions that approach privacy and security from various perspectives that don’t always align. This presents a challenge for businesses to continue to operate efficiently while minimizing risk and dealing with multiple global privacy and security regulations.

Regardless of the specific trends we expect to see this year, one thing is certain – the global data privacy landscape will continue to change rapidly, creating a fascinating environment for data privacy and security lawyers to practice in.  I am very excited to be a part of such a dynamic team that will continue to provide services to our clients in this space.

Watch Jordan’s video prediction here.


Key Takeaways

Today, as well as every other day of the year, we hope you take some time to reflect on data privacy and security and the ways you can better protect your personal or business’ private information. The Beckage team is passionate about to educating the masses on the importance of data security, the consumer privacy rights and the impact on businesses, and the steps you can take safeguard your information. We are committed to providing updates on relevant legislation, current threats, and proactive data security steps. Be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, read our blog, and subscribe to our newsletter to stay up to date on the latest in this ever-changing space. Happy Data Privacy Day!

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2020Looking Back on 2020’s Top Privacy and Cybersecurity Trends

Looking Back on 2020’s Top Privacy and Cybersecurity Trends

As 2020 comes to a close, Beckage looks back on the ways this difficult and unprecedented year impacted the data privacy and cybersecurity landscape both domestically and across the globe.

Enhanced Privacy Challenges and Concerns Due to Covid-19

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, businesses around the globe made a major pivot to online or virtual operations early this year. An intentional focus on data protection and a solid understanding of the regulatory landscape is a legal requirement that demands the integration of data protection up front in any network design or business practice. The increase in exposure of company assets made it necessary to implement a variety of technical safeguards. Companies still had to meet the compliance milestones of the NY SHIELD Act and California’s Consumer Protection Act (CCPA) while dealing with new privacy challenges caused by a distributed workforce and a global health pandemic. Beckage reminds organizations of the importance of revisiting their readiness through business continuity, incident response, and more expansive administrative, technical, and physical safeguards when shifting to a work-from-home model and recommends continued assessment of your company’s privacy pitfalls in this ever-shifting legal landscape.

Increased Ransomware and Cyberattacks

With rapid changes in organizational operations caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, attackers became more sophisticated in their strategies and unleashed several unrelenting, simultaneous attacks on service providers and the organizations they serve in 2020. Victims of recent cyber attacks, such as the SolarWinds campaign carried out in December, include government agencies, healthcare providers, consulting agencies, and , technology, telecom, and oil and gas companies. In many of these campaigns, attackers were able to gain access and move freely throughout an organization’s server, installing additional software, creating new accounts, and accessing sensitive data and valuable resources while remaining largely undetected. In response to the uptick in data incidents this year, the Beckage Incident Response Team recommends organizations implement several preventative steps to safeguard their organization to help minimize legal risk.

Patient Access Rights and Interoperability

Recent developments in 2020 concerning patients’ right to access health information to implement interoperability and record access requirements intend to help patients obtain access to health records and payment data to make informed decisions about their healthcare. The CMS Proposed Rule and the OCR Proposed Rule represent a complete overhaul of well-established standards and an introduction of new and highly technical requirements with healthcare compliance. The experienced Health Law Team at Beckage can help to distill these lengthy and complicated rules so organizations can understand practical implications on daily operations.

Increased International Focus on Consumer Privacy

On the heels of EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), many countries followed suit by establishing legal frameworks for governing how organizations collect, use, and store their citizens’ personal data. One example is Brazil’s Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados (LGPD), which went into effect in August of 2020. This general data protection law, which closely mimics the GDPR, places strict requirements on organizations that process Brazilian citizen’s personal data.

At the same time, Europe continued to elevate its enforcement of the GDPR, with major decisions from various member state Data Protection Authorities, the European Court of Justice (ECJ), and the European Data Protection Board (EDBP). The most impactful for businesses across the globe was the ECJ’s decision in Schrems II, which invalidated the EU-US Privacy Shield and called into question the long-term viability of the Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) to transfer data from the EU to the US. In 2021, companies should closely monitor the evolving guidance on international data transfers and be prepared to mitigate risk of global data transfers.

Beckage’s Global Data Privacy Team expects continued adoption of data protection regulations across many regions, and an emphasis on creating global security and privacy compliance programs in the year ahead.

Uptick in ADA Litigation

This past year, the Beckage Accessibility Team has witnessed a drastic increase in litigation under Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. On average, about eight new lawsuits are filed a day by disabled individuals alleging unequal access to goods and services provided on a company’s digital platforms. While the Department of Justice (DOJ) has consistently held that the ADA applies to websites and mobile apps, they have failed to clarify the precise requirements for a business to be deemed compliant. This has prompted a wave of litigation by plaintiffs’ who claim a website or mobile app’s incompatibility with assistive technology, like screen-reading software, has denied them full access to and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, and accommodations of the website, therefore violating the ADA. Most of these lawsuits are settled quickly out of court to avoid litigating in such uncertain legal terrain.

Beckage handles the defense of website accessibility lawsuits as well as assists companies in navigate pre and post-suit settlement agreements for this unique area of the law.  Beckage also works with clients under privilege to conduct internal and remedial audits of client websites and mobile applications, evaluate platform compatibility and oversee implementation of recommended remedial or accessibility-enhancement measures.

California Consumer Protection Act (CCPA)  

Enforcement of California’s comprehensive California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) began on July 1, 2020 and has brought a range of plaintiff related lawsuits under its private right of action provision expanding California breach laws. For a data breach to be actionable, the information accessed must be identified as personal information, as narrowly defined by California’s data breach notification law. Recently, in November 2020, the Consumer Right To Privacy Act (CRPA) ballot initiative was passed, creating additional privacy rights and obligations pertaining to sensitive personal information that will go into effect. CPRA also expands data breach liability created by the CCPA, adds a private right of action for unauthorized access that permits access to an account if the business failed to maintain reasonable security, and imposes data protection obligations directly on service providers, contractors, and third parties. Beckage urges businesses who operate in or serve California citizens to continue to follow CCPA developments and carefully monitor related litigation in the coming months.

Emerging Technologies

The recent expansion of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) has resulted in numerous class actions suits against organizations alleged to have collected plaintiffs’ biometric data. With the expanding use of biometric equipment, these claims often allege defendants obtained plaintiffs’ biometric data without complying with the BIPA’s notification and consent requirements. Upcoming class suits may address the issue of BIPA having an extraterritorial effect when bringing claims against out of state vendors.

Similarly, computers that manipulate the media, known as deep fakes, advance the dangers of influenced perceptions. The advancements of deep fakes are giving rise to laws regarding defamation, trade libel, false light, violation of right of publicity, or intentional infliction of emotional distress. Sophisticated tech lawyers can assist in determining rights and technological solutions to mitigate harm. As former tech business owners, Beckage lawyers want to drive innovation with use of these new and emerging technologies while understanding standards and laws that may impact such development. Beckage recommends that companies proactively mitigate the risks associated with collecting biometric information and deep fakes to prevent legal repercussions and defamation. 

Key Takeaways

2020 proved to be an unpredictable year in more ways than one. The COVID-19 pandemic forced companies to rapidly adapt to new privacy and data security challenges caused by a distributed workforce, emerging technologies, and an increased focus on ecommerce with in-person shopping and events. As we move towards 2021 with no definitive end to the pandemic in sight, it is crucial for companies to prioritize data privacy and cybersecurity initiatives by consulting qualified legal tech experts who can help navigate the uncertainty next year will bring. Beckage attorneys can assist in creating, implementing, and evaluating robust data security and privacy infrastructures that will help put your business in a position to tackle all the challenges 2021 has in store.

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