Beckage in the News: Protecting Against Deepfakes

Beckage Managing Director, Jennifer Beckage was quoted in a recent Super Lawyers article, where she detailed the steps businesses can take to protect against becoming a victim of a deepfake scam.

“The first step is educating the board and executive teams that these things can be out there, and be used to cause harm or embarrassment,” she says. “It’s not unusual for an executive to have something like this happen to try to smear or tarnish their reputation.”

She also notes there are tools available to help monitor for deepfakes, like Microsoft Video Authenticator, for example, which analyzes photo and video and gives users a confidence score regarding the validity of the sample. 

And then there’s common sense. “We all should be looking more critically at certain things in certain circumstances,” she says. “For example, if an employee receives a video from the president of their company directing them to wire money, ask, ‘Would the president usually send me a video?’”

Jennifer Beckage, Managing Director, Beckage.

Beckage also commented on the recent FBI warning about the rise of deepfakes, which gave consumers tips on how to spot a deepfake. 

“The agency suggests looking between the eyes—does it seem like there’s too much space? Also, does there seem to be an issue with lip and mouth synchronization?” Further guidance includes looking for strange movement in relation to the head and torso.

“But there’s nothing more important than having an incident-response plan,” Beckage says. “If you have a business continuity plan that walks an organization through a fire or a flood, you should have a plan in place that addresses the unique circumstances of a data-security incident. What we often see is that deepfakes are usually part of something else—they tend to arise in the context of a data breach.”

Jennifer Beckage, Managing Director, Beckage

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